All the Tracks on Mariah Carey’s ‘Music Box,’ Ranked

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Kevin Mazur Archive/WireImage

By the summer of 1993, the public had come to know Mariah Carey as the most successful new diva in the pop world. The brown-eyed, curly-haired singer’s glass-shattering voice and talent for writing hit songs was quickly setting the standard for ‘90s pop superstardom.

With two multi-Platinum albums already behind her, fans and music critics eagerly awaited the arrival of Carey’s third studio album, Music Box. While Carey’s previous studio effort, 1991’s Emotions, leaned on R&B, soul and gospel influences for inspiration, Music Box took a slightly different approach, focusing its attention toward more pop, radio-friendly confections. Lyrically, many of the songs depict Mariah as a hopeless romantic, while others (e.g. “Hero”) preach self-sufficiency.

Despite receiving some harsh reviews from music critics, who claimed that Music Box lacked emotion and substantial writing, the 10-track LP became Carey’s first to be certified Diamond by the RIAA, selling over 10 million copies in the U.S. alone, and spawned two No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100, “Dreamlover” and “Hero.” The diva’s fifth studio project, Daydream, would mostly follow in the Music Boxmold, to even greater success and favorable reviews praising Carey’s songwriting skill. Mimi would eventually return to her R&B roots with 1997’s Butterfly, but the blockbuster success of Music Box and Daydream ultimately helped the Long Island native become the top-selling artist of the ‘90s.

To celebrate Music Box’s 25th anniversary this Friday (Aug. 31), we ranked all the tracks on the now-iconic LP.

Read my latest story for Billboard [here].

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[EXCLUSIVE] MÝA TALKS NEW ‘TKO’ ALBUM & 20 YEARS OF MAKING MUSIC: ‘I AM RELENTLESS’

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Photo credit: Jackie O. Asare

In 2000, Mýa acknowledged her Fear of Flying with the release of her sophomore studio project.

“Fear of Flying is a metaphor for the ups and downs of life,” she explained to Billboard magazine. “It’s about handling things like an adult, knowing you must have faith to make anything happen.”

Fast forward to the year 2018 and Mýa is now in complete control of her career and her image. Following the accidental release of her fourth studio LP, Liberation in 2007, the Washington DC native took the independent route and has been at it non-stop ever since.

We recently caught up with Mýa to discuss her ninth independent project, TKO (The Knock Out), trusting your gut and being a #GirlBoss.

Why do you think so many artists who’ve had success are taking the independent route nowadays?

Mýa: Artists who are passionate about their music and in love with their art go independent because they want to continue making music and serving it to the world. Often, when you’re signed to a major label, you have to wait in line for budgets to open up and get cleared. A life without music feels like it’s not a life at all, so when you’re in love with something, you want to constantly be able to do it without restraints. That’s part of the empowerment and freedom that being independent brings and allows.

Was there anything about going independent in the very beginning that made you rethink your decision?

Mýa: It was always a learning process and it still is for me ten years later. I learned different components of the business, from publishing to copyright to radio and how each area works. It has truly been a blessing for me to absorb the knowledge that I would not have absorbed had I stayed in a system, which is a beautiful system. It made me who I am, but there are fans that are still here and are hungry for music and now they can receive it because you have the luxury to put out a new project any time that you’d like as an independent artist. In the process of new territory, you learn new things, but there’s never been a moment where I regretted my decision. I have considered going into the major label system differently, which may just be distribution because I now have more to bring to the table as a label versus just an artist looking for a budget.

Read my full interview with Mýa for The Boombox [here].

Why Craig David’s ‘Born To Do It’ Is Still A Gem 18 Years Later

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Credit: Apple Music

R&B music was at its prime throughout the ‘90s with then-emerging acts, including Aaliyah, Brandy, Monica, Mýa, Destiny’s Child, Usher, Boyz II Men and Jodeci, working their heads off to keep the genre exciting and fresh. Quincy Jones enlisted Teddy Riley to work his new jack swing magic on the late Michael Jackson’s Dangerous album (e.g. “Remember the Time” and “Jam”) in 1991, marking the King of Pop’s foray into more of an urban sound. After ruling the ‘80s, Whitney Houston transitioned into the ‘90s seamlessly with the help of Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds, who co-wrote the No. 1 hit, “I’m Your Baby Tonight.” A new generation of rising superstars forced veteran performers to take notes.

As 2000 ushered in a new millennium, British R&B singers wanted in on the excitement as well, but they had their own unique musical style to offer– enter Craig David’s Born to Do It, which fused R&B with England’s distinctive garage beats. Selling upwards of 8 million copies worldwide, the 12-track LP went on to become the fastest-selling debut album by a British male solo act. Just nine years ago, MTV UK viewers voted Born to Do It as the greatest album of all time behind MJ’s Thriller.

Nearly 20 years after its release, Born to Do It holds more relevance than ever before. Insert Drake’s vulnerability on “Find Your Love” (2010) or the intricate lyrical rhythm on Ed Sheeran’s “Shape Of You” (2017). Justin Bieber’s “Recovery” (2013) borrows from “Fill Me In,” the lead single off Born to Do It.

The Born to Do It title was inspired by a quote in the classic 1971 film, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, but it also presented David as the next big breakout star.

Read more of my latest article for Vibe [here].